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Your Gut May Be to Blame for Your Blood Infection A Stanford University study of 30 patients with bloodstream infections showed that the infections mostly started in patients' own bodies -- often in the large intestine.

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Despite Crisis, Most Want Opioids for Post-Op... The survey, of more than 500 patients scheduled for surgery, found that more than three-quarters expected to get opioids afterward. Most also thought opioids were the most effective treatment for post-surgery pain.

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Cancer Bell Ringing Angers Some Who Can Only... For patients whose cancer has spread, who cannot "beat" cancer, the sound of the bell can trigger anger, resentment, resignation, or depression, according to various online accounts.

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What Kids Fear Most at the Doctor's Office Half of 2- to 5-year-olds are afraid of going to the doctor, according to a new survey. And some kids get so upset that 1 in 5 parents say they find it hard to concentrate on what the doctor or nurse is saying.

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Kids' Concussion Symptoms May Persist for a Year A year after a concussion, as many as 31 percent of kids ages 4 to 15 still had symptoms that included inattention or fatigue, researchers report.

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FDA: Unapproved Ingredients in Many Supplements Many dietary supplements, especially those promising enhanced sexual pleasure or weight loss, contain unapproved and potentially dangerous ingredients, the FDA says.

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Pot May Help MS A Little, But Questions Remain People with MS who used cannabis-derived drugs reported slightly fewer muscle contractions, less bladder dysfunction and pain in a new study. But the self-reported results differed from those doctors came up with.

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CDC: More Kids Not Getting Recommended Vaccines The percentage of U.S. children under 2 who haven't received any recommended vaccinations quadrupled in the past 17 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

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Study: C-Section Rates Nearly Doubled Since 2000 Worldwide, births by C-section nearly doubled between 2000 and 2015, a new study has found.

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Are Shorter Days Linked to Postpartum Depression? Pregnant women’s odds of developing postpartum depression were strongly influenced by the number of daylight hours during the last month of pregnancy and immediately after delivery, a new study has found.

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Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups Diet was much less important than the individual's genes in deciding whether they would develop hyperuricemia, which can lead to gout, according to researchers who analyzed data from nearly 17,000 American men and women of European ancestry.

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Pop Culture: Behind the Pimple Video Craze Videos of pimples being squeezed or drained get millions of views regularly on YouTube. One Southern California dermatologist who calls herself Dr. Pimple Popper has a television show. But why does this thing that makes some of us recoil captivate so many others

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Flu Shot in Pregnancy Keeps Women Out of Hospital In pregnant women, the flu shot protects equally during all three trimesters, and for those with health problems like asthma and diabetes, a new study finds. It also reduces hospitalizations for complications like pneumonia.

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Obesity Doubles Younger Women's Colon Cancer Odds Women aged 20 to 49 who were overweight or obese had up to twice the risk for colon cancer before age 50, compared with normal-weight women, in a new study.

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What’s The Right Amount of Sleep? A recent study of more than 40,000 people worldwide confirms the sweet spot for sleep: People who got average of seven to eight hours a night did better than those who got more or less sleep a night.

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Skip the Cold Meds for Kids Under 6, Experts Say Decongestants should not be given to children younger than 6 because there's no evidence that they do any good, according to a new review published online Oct. 10 in the BMJ.

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California Typhus Outbreak Continues to Grow The typhus involved in the L.A. outbreak is known as murine typhus and can spread to people from infected feces of fleas. The feces of fleas are infected with bacteria called Rickettsia typhi, according to the CDC.

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A-Fib Tied to Higher Odds for Dementia In a new study, people who had atrial fibrillation were 40 percent more likely to develop dementia than those without the heart condition.

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Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Easier Deliveries A new study of almost 6,000 women in Sweden found weight-loss surgery was tied to fewer cesarean sections, infections, tears, hemorrhages or post-term deliveries.

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Could Eczema Drug Restore Hair Lost To Alopecia? A 13-year-old girl with alopecia totalis -- a total lack of scalp hair -- and eczema, began growing hair on her head again after she began weekly injections of dupilumab (Dupixent) to treat her eczema, doctors report. It’s the first known such case.

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Smoggy Air Tied to Higher Odds for Mouth Cancers Middle-aged men living in 64 municipalities throughout Taiwan were more likely to develop oral cancer if they lived in places with high levels of air pollutants, researchers report.

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Can Short Fasts Help Reverse Type 2 Diabetes? A small study has showed that occasional 24-hour fasting regimens can significantly reverse or eliminate the need for diabetic medication.

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Home Fridge May Not Be Best For Your Insulin Even though diabetes patients often store insulin in refrigerators at home for months before they use it, little is known about how temperature variations affect insulin quality, researchers say.

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Hospital Privacy Curtains May Harbor Risky Germs Privacy curtains in hospital rooms became more contaminated the longer they stayed in place, and by the 14th day, 88 percent tested positive for MRSA bacteria, a serious threat to patients, a new study says.

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Study: Early Pushing In Birth Won't Hurt Mom,... In a new study of 2,400 first-time moms, early pushing didn't increase the need for C-sections. It was also associated with lower odds of hemorrhage and infection.

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Global Warming Will Hike Mental Health Woes:... The researchers said that over five years, a 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degree Fahrenheit) increase in average temperature is associated with higher rates of mental health issues, CNN reported.

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Polio-Like Condition in Kids on Rise Again in... The condition, acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), was first identified in 2014, when there were 120 cases, NBC News reported.

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Study: Bariatric Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk A new study has found a 10- to 100-fold higher risk of gallstones, other gallbladder conditions and pancreatitis in people who had undergone weight-loss surgery.

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Lose Excess Pounds, Lower Breast Cancer Risk? Women who lost 5 percent or more of their body weight had a 12 percent lower breast cancer risk than those whose weight remained the same, according to a study in the journal Cancer.

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Could Impotence Be in Your Genes? Gene changes in a specific spot in the human genome are significantly associated with an increased risk of impotence, researchers have found.

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One-Third of 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods in... One-third of foods labeled “gluten free” in U.S. restaurants actually contain trace amounts of the protein that can cause digestive upset for people with celiac disease, according to a new study.

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Study: No Link Between Gout Drug, Kidney Disease Taking the drug allopurinol to manage gout, a painful form of arthritis, is not only safe, but also potentially beneficial in reducing risk of kidney disease, researchers say.

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FDA Expands Gardasil to Cover Adults to Age 45 About 14 million Americans become infected with HPV every year, the CDC says. About 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and about 4,000 women die from cervical cancer caused by certain HPV viruses.

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FDA Bans Seven Artificial Food Flavorings While the FDA says it believes the substances are safe for human consumption, several health and consumer groups were able to prove the chemicals caused cancer in rats in high doses.

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Half of Antibiotics Given With No Infection Noted Of more than 500,000 antibiotic prescriptions analyzed in a new study, nearly half were written without an infection-related diagnosis.

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FDA Allows Sales of First Self-Fitting Hearing... The Bose Hearing Aid is for mild to moderate hearing loss. It's the first of its kind where users can set and fit it themselves.

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'Broken Heart Syndrome' Needs Careful Monitoring Broken heart syndrome, a sudden weakening of the heart muscle brought on by stressful events, can lead to bigger heart problems, and people who have it should be monitored closely, a new study says.

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Does Aspirin Help Prevent Liver Cancer? Taking two or more standard-dose (325 milligram) aspirin a week was associated with a 49 percent lower risk of liver cancer, researchers found in a new study.

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Big, Fat Tumors: Liposarcomas Can Top 70 Pounds Sarcomas in the soft tissues (such as fat, nerves, ligaments, muscles) of all types are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all malignant tumors in adults. In 2018, the American Cancer Society estimates, about 13,000 new soft-tissue sarcomas of all types will be diagnosed, and about 5,000 Americans will die of them.

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Many Young Drug Abusers Not Tested for Hep C In a recent federal study, only 36 percent of teens and young adults identified with opioid addiction were tested for hepatitis C, the researchers found, missing a chance to treat the deadly infection.

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Study: Vitamin D Supplements Don't Build Bone A review of previously published studies found that taking either high or low doses of vitamin D supplements didn't prevent fractures or falls, or improve bone density.

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Is BPA Dangerous? Scientists, FDA Divided Because of safety concerns, France has banned BPA in food packaging. California lists BPA as being toxic to the female reproductive and requires manufacturers to warn consumers if certain chemicals are in their products.

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Mediterranean Diet May Help Preserve Your Vision The Mediterranean diet’s combination of fruits, legumes, whole grains, olive oil and fish seems to reduce the risk of late-stage age-related macular degeneration, a new study finds.

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Flu Season Lingers in Big Cities A city's flu season is apt to last longer as its population increases and workplaces become more focused within a few key spots, a new study suggests.

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Can 'Noah's Ark' of Microbes Save World Health? Because of the decreasing diversity of microscopic organisms that live on human bodies, scientists say we need to capture and preserve many germs that exist around the world, a “Noah's Ark" of beneficial human microbes.

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Low-Dose Aspirin May Cut Ovarian Cancer Risk Researchers say that women who reported recent, regular use of low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less) had a 23 percent lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than those who did not regularly take aspirin.

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Does Neanderthal DNA Help Humans Fight Disease? Neanderthal genes -- the result of interbreeding with humans -- probably gave people today some protection against viruses that our ancestors encountered when they left Africa, new research suggests.

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Brain Scans Suggest Pain of Fibromyalgia Isn't... People with fibromyalgia had more brain inflammation than healthy people, according to a study published recently in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. It’s a finding researchers say could be a bright spot for often-stigmatized people with the chronic pain condition

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Processed Meats Increase Risk of Breast Cancer They analyzed studies that included more than 1.2 million women and found that those who regularly ate processed meats were 9 percent more likely to develop breast cancer, CNN reported.

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Marijuana a Threat to Teens' Brains: Study Among the teens in the study, 28 percent admitted to at least some marijuana use, and 75 percent said they used alcohol at least occasionally.

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Articles last updated at Oct 15, 2018 21:08:28pm.
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