Home  |  Advertising  |  Contact Us  |  Norfolk Businesses  |  Real Estate  |  Refer A Friend  |  Weather  |  Login  |  Register

Navigation
  Home
 
  About Norfolk, VA
 
  Advertising
 
  Colonial Williamsburg
 
  Contact Us
 
  Editorial Page
 
  Family Living
 
  FAQs
 
  Fishing Home Page
 
  Games Zone
 
  Home Improvements
 
  Horoscopes
 
  Kids Zone
 
  Local Jobs
 
  Local News
 
  Lottery Results
 
  Movies Now Playing
 
  Norfolk Businesses
 
  Norfolk Schools
 
  Pet Adoptions
 
  Polls
 
  Real Estate
 
  Real Estate Articles
 
  Recipes
 
  Refer A Friend
 
  Site Map
 
  Travel
 
  Weather
 
  WebMD
 
  What's New

Coupons.com

Print FREE Grocery Coupons at Home


Cruise Direct


WebMD

WebMD Health Logo WebMD Health

Bookmark and Share

Erectile Dysfunction Drugs Found in E-Cig Liquids Because the products are not properly labeled, they could pose a risk to people who take nitrates for high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease.

More...
Recalled Kotex Tampons Can Unravel Inside Body The recall in the United States and Canada involves certain lots of the product made between Oct. 7, 2016, and Oct. 16, 2018, and distributed between Oct. 17, 2016, and Oct. 23, 2018.

More...
Later Start to School Brings Kids Better Grades After a school district delayed the start time of secondary schools from 7:50 to 8:45, the students gained 35 minutes of daily sleep, felt less sleepy, improved their grades, and increased their attendance and punctuality.

More...
AFM Has Doctors, Families Trying 'Whatever Works' The number of AFM cases confirmed in the United States this week hit a record high of 158 in 36 states.

More...
Weight Loss Surgery Carries 'Easy Way Out'... Almost 40 percent of nearly a thousand people surveyed in a new study thought weight loss surgery (or "bariatric surgery") was this kind of lazy, quick fix for weight loss.

More...
Just How Clean Is That Stethoscope? All stethoscopes examined were significantly contaminated with a large number and extensive variety of bacteria, including some that can cause health care-associated infections, the study found.

More...
Fentanyl Now the No. 1 Opioid OD Killer According to the DEA, fentanyl is added to heroin to increase its potency, or is disguised as highly potent heroin. Although many drug users think they are buying heroin, they don't know they're buying fentanyl. Because of its potency, overdose deaths can occur.

More...
Animal, Bug Bites a Billion-Dollar Burden Attacks by mountain lions, bears and alligators get the most press, but the tiniest critters create the most work for emergency room doctors. Bug bites and stings account for more than half of all animal-related trips to the ER, the authors of a new study discovered.

More...
Women Often Wait to Call Help in a Heart Attack Researchers in Switzerland found that women suffering a heart attack typically waited 37 minutes longer than men before calling an ambulance.

More...
Hidden Dangers in Dust Researchers who analyzed dust samples found that in those with higher concentrations of triclosan, bacteria were more likely to have genetic changes indicating antibiotic resistance.

More...
With Diabetes, Must You Fast for Blood Tests? New research shows that up to 22 percent of people with diabetes who fasted for lab tests had a low blood sugar episode (hypoglycemia) while waiting for the test.

More...
Man Coughs Up Blood Clot In Perfect Image of Lung Doctors later inserted a tube down his trachea and into his lungs and found a little bit of blood in branches of his lower part of his right lung.

More...
Jimmy Dean Sausages Recalled Over Metal Pieces The USDA has not released a list of stores where the sausages were sold.

More...
Hospital Discharge Around Holidays Can Be Riskier People discharged from the hospital during the Christmas break period had a higher risk of death or readmission compared with people discharged at other times, new research shows.

More...
Brain-Eating Amoeba Tied to Tap Water in Neti Pot This a rare case that serves as a reminder for people to follow the directions when using a Neti pot, and to use only boiled or distilled water, said Dr. Charles Cobbs, a neurosurgeon at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle who treated the woman, CBS News reported.

More...
Supreme Court Declines Key Planned Parenthood... Abortion opponents have say Planned Parenthood -- the nation's largest abortion provider -- should not receive any government money.

More...
New Exercise Guidelines Urge Everyone: Just Move This is only the second time HHS has released these types of physical activity recommendations. The original set was issued in 2008

More...
Study: Statins’ Benefits Solid, Side Effects... The benefits of statins are clear, and side effects from the cholesterol-fighting drugs are rare, according to a new analysis of decades of scientific research.

More...
Autism, ADHD Tied to Raised Risk in Siblings Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly four times as likely to be diagnosed with ADHD, researchers report.

More...
Have Heart Failure? Flu Shot May Save Your Life People who were recently diagnosed with heart failure and got a flu shot cut their risk of premature death by 18 percent, compared with not getting a shot, according to a new study from Denmark.

More...
Electronic Health Records Bogging Docs Down Managing electronic health records is creating “technology-related stress” for physicians, and primary care doctors are most at risk, according to a new survey.

More...
Almost Half of U.S. Adults to Skip Flu Shot Results showed that 43% of adults have received the flu shot and that 14% had not yet been vaccinated but planned to be. Yet 41% of adults surveyed said they did not plan to get vaccinated. About 2% were undecided or did not respond.

More...
Opioids Exact Another Toll on Newborns: Smaller... Infants born addicted to opioids had significantly smaller head circumferences, researchers have found, potentially putting them at higher risk for mental health and developmental problems.

More...
Family, School Support May Help Stop Bullies The stronger a student's reported positive family relationships, the more likely a student was to deem aggressive behaviors and retaliation unacceptable, and the more likely they were to intervene in either case, researchers found in a recent study.

More...
Too Much Salt Might Help Spur A-Fib People with the highest levels of salt in their diet had a higher rate of atrial fibrillation than those with the lowest salt intake in a new study.

More...
Valsartan Blood Pressure Drug Recall Widens The drugs were recalled because of trace amounts of an impurity, N-nitrosodiethylamine, or NDEA, which may cause cancer in humans, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

More...
Study Finds 'Mismatch' of Mental Health Need,... About one-third of people with serious mental health distress –don’t get the care they need, according to a new study. Instead, much of treatment is going to people suffering from little to no psychological distress.

More...
Drug May Cut Hot Flashes After Breast Cancer A familiar drug for urinary incontinence has been found to reduce hot flashes in women after breast cancer.

More...
Healthy Lifestyle Lowers Odds of Breast... Healthier lifestyles might improve the prognosis of people with breast cancer if they will stick with the positive changes, researchers say.

More...
With Same Breast Cancer Care, Black Women Do... In a recent study, leveling the playing field by bringing women to the same doctors and getting the same treatment" didn't equalize breast cancer outcomes between black and white women.

More...
Liquid Ibuprofen Recalled at Walmart, CVS, Others Infants run a small risk of permanent kidney damage from the higher concentration of ibuprofen.

More...
Want More Easy Protein? Go Eat a Bug The movement to encourage eating of insects — and to make it not weird, but a common practice (as it already is in other parts of the world) -- is clearly under way in the U.S.

More...
Lower-Dose Tamoxifen Works As Well As High-Dose New research shows that a lower dose of the hormone therapy Tamoxifen is as effective as the higher dose treatment in helping to prevent breast cancer from returning and guarding against new cancers in women who had high-risk breast tissue.

More...
Study Again Links Obesity, Heart Failure Survival A new study is the latest to confirm the so-called "obesity paradox," a puzzling pattern that researchers have noted for years: Obese patients with heart disease tend to survive longer than their normal-weight counterparts.

More...
Can Supervised Heroin Programs Help Opioid... To assess the effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment, the researchers examined evidence from Canada, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

More...
Another Plus to Cardiac Rehab: Better Sex Attending cardiac rehab is associated with improved sexual function and more frequent sex, according to a new evidence review.

More...
Too Much Time in the Sun? Skin Patch Might Tell Powered by the sun while designed to measure its rays, the patch automatically transmits sun readings to a user's smartphone. It works wet or dry, is fully reusable, and weighs next to nothing.

More...
Rapid Test for Cancer Developed by Researchers The team at the University of Queensland in Australia created the test after discovering that cancer forms a unique DNA structure when placed in water, CNN reported.

More...
Too Much Sleep May Bring Heart Disease, Death... The authors of the study published Dec. 5 in the European Heart Journal also found that daytime napping was associated with an increased risk of heart disease and death among those who slept more than six hours a night, but not among those who got less sleep.

More...
Infections in the Young Tied Mental Illness Risk The risk appeared greater for severe infections that required hospitalization. But less severe infections treated with drugs were also linked to an increased risk for mental disorders, the researchers found.

More...
An App, Your Fingernail -- and Anemia Screening... The app converts fingernail colors into quick readings of blood hemoglobin levels, according to researchers at Emory University in Atlanta. They said the technology could be used by anyone at any time, but its use right now is  limited to screening, not a formal diagnosis of anemia.

More...
Adenovirus Kills 12 in 2 States, But What Is It? Adenovirus refers to a cluster of viruses -- more than 50 known strains -- that most commonly infect the respiratory system. Each strain may bring about a different set of symptoms, such as the common cold, sore throat, fever, bronchitis, and pneumonia

More...
New Chlamydia Test Offers Rapid Results Study leader Charlotte Gaydos said the goal of point-of-care technology is to deliver quick results and give patients more options.

More...
As Gun Violence Grows, U.S. Life Expectancy Drops In terms of life expectancy, gun-related violence has a greater impact on blacks, while suicide had a greater impact on whites.

More...
Drug Halves Recurrence for Common Breast Cancer All of the women in the new trial had undergone a standard treatment scenario. First, they received traditional chemotherapy and the drug Herceptin (trastuzumab) -- an antibody that targets HER2-positive cancer cells. Then they had surgery to remove any remaining cancer.

More...
More Green Space May Mean a Healthier Heart The investigators also found lower levels of F2-isoprostane in the participants' urine, which indicates less oxidative stress and better health. The study also showed that folks from greener spaces had greater ability to repair blood vessels.

More...
First Baby Born From Uterus of Deceased Donor One U.S. fertility expert said the success in this case really could be a breakthrough.

More...
New Drug Treats Dogs Scared by Loud Noises Pexion (imepitoin tablets), just approved by the Food and Drug Administration, is for dogs scared by loud noises such as fireworks, street/traffic racket, and gun shots.

More...
1 in 10 Will Develop Eczema in Their Lifetime A new report confirms that eczema risk is common among children, that risk starts to drop off by young adulthood and middle age, but rises again when people reach their 70s.

More...
Sickle Cell Gene Therapy Makes Another Advance The therapy targets the genetic flaw that causes sickle cell. In a small group of patients, researchers said the therapy appears safe and effective enough to keep moving forward into larger trials.

More...
Articles last updated at Dec 12, 2018 19:00:10pm.
Next update in 60 minutes.



Basic Nutrition Science

McPherson Marketing

Create your own banner at mybannermaker.com!


e-Diets.com

Click Here for your FREE Diet Profile from eDiets!


One Life Fitness



Copyright 2018, MyNorfolkConnection.com