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Pot Still a Drug of Choice for Many U.S. Adults Daily marijuana use was highest among adults aged 18 to 34.  Adults aged 50 to 64 were the only age group with increases in non-daily marijuana use both before and after 2007, the researchers reported.

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Could Herpes Virus Play a Role in Alzheimer's? Human herpes virus 6 and 7 were found in Alzheimer's-affected brains at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer's, the scientists reported Thursday.

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Laser Pointer Burns Hole in Boy's Retina Vision in the 9-year-old boy's injured left eye is 20/100 and doctors who treated him said it's not possible to restore normal vision to that eye. The boy's right eye has 20/20 vision.

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Tips and Tricks For Tick Prevention The Pocono Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center in Stroudsburg says that many people have requested opossums to release into their yards. The popular program got started in 2016.

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Study: Same Genes Drive Many Psychiatric Issues Overall, the current study found, psychiatric disorders shared many of the same underlying genetic factors. Some of the greatest genetic overlap was seen among major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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10% of Doctors Sexually Harassed in Last 3 Years Among doctors who had been harassed, 47% said another doctor harassed them; 16% said they were harassed by nurses.

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Many With Severe Allergies Don't Carry an EpiPen While 89 percent of people surveyed did fill their prescription for the auto-injector, "almost half (45 percent) said they didn't have [one] with them during their most severe allergic reaction," said study lead author Christopher Warren, of the University of Southern California.

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TB Vaccine Linked to Better Type 1 Diabetes... A little more than three years after getting two tuberculosis shots four weeks apart, about 50 people with type 1 diabetes saw their long-term average blood sugar levels drop significantly -- and for at least five years.

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WHO Calls ‘Gaming Disorder’ Mental Health... The World Health Organization will recognize “gaming disorder” as a diagnosable condition, a decision that has sparked controversy among psychiatric experts.

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Smartphone-Obsessed Parents May Mean Cranky Kids Parents who take refuge in their smartphones when their kids throw a tantrum may, in the long run, make matters worse, a new study suggests.

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Florida Teen First Human Case of Mosquito-Borne... The first confirmed human case of Keystone virus has been diagnosed in a Florida teen, but it's likely that infection with the mosquito-borne disease is common among state residents, researchers report.

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Why Obese People Find It So Tough to Slim Down People who overweight and obese hold starkly different views on diet and exercise than their normal-weight peers, making it difficult for them to get to a healthy weight, a new study finds.

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When the Heart Stops, Drugs Often to Blame "Hidden" drug overdoses account for nearly 1 in 7 sudden cardiac deaths, a new study says.

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What Is a 'Good Death'? As assisted suicide gains more acceptance and people push back on extreme end-of-life measures, some people are asking whether we should pay more attention to the quality of our death and what that means.

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How Much Drinking Is Healthy -- or Not? People who have a few drinks a week tend to live a bit longer than teetotalers do -- but even moderate drinking may raise the risk of certain cancers, a large, new study finds.

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Marriage Is Good Medicine for the Heart Add protection from heart disease and stroke to the health benefits of marriage.

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Obesity Plagues Rural America People that live in rural areas are being hit harder by the U.S. obesity epidemic than city dwellers, two new government studies show.

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Severe Stress May Send Immune System Into... Trauma or intense stress may up your odds of developing an autoimmune disease, a new study suggests.

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People With Diabetes Forgo Medical Care Due to... Nearly half (45 percent) of Americans with diabetes sometimes do without care because they can't afford it, a new survey reveals.

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Single Blood Test Might Diagnose Diabetes New research suggests that a single blood test could confirm type 2 diabetes, saving patients time and health care costs.

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U.S. Smoking Rate Hits All-Time Low Fewer than 14 percent of American adults smoked cigarettes in 2017, the lowest level seen since data collection started in 1965, government health officials reported Tuesday.

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Disney's 'Incredibles 2' Could Pose Epilepsy Risk The memo asks theaters showing the movie to flag customers to the scene, USA Today reported.

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Congress May Soon Make CBD From Hemp Legal Republican and Democratic leaders of the U.S. Senate agree, but obstacles remain before hemp would be legalized.

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How 'Helicopter' Parenting Impedes a Child's... While the researchers only found an association, rather than a cause-and-effect link, they determined that 2-year-olds exposed to this kind of parenting ended up less able to regulate their own emotions and behavior by age 5. That upped the risk for emotional problems at age 10.

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Young Marijuana Users Face Psychosis Risk Finding out marijuana’s role in mental illness is especially important during adolescence, a period when both psychosis and marijuana use typically start.

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Today's Sleepy Teens Tomorrow's Heart Patients? Average sleep duration for kids in the study was only a little over seven hours per day, researchers found.

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What If You Lose Your Child at an Amusement Park? While most parents said they would report a ride operator who appeared impaired by alcohol or drugs, less than half said they would report a ride operator who used a cellphone while operating a ride.

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Pediatricians Say No to Spanking The survey revealed that 74 percent of respondents did not approve of spanking, and 78 percent said spanking never or rarely leads to better behavior.

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Vitamin D May Guard Against Colon Cancer The chances of developing colon cancer decline about 19 percent in women and 7 percent in men for every incremental increase in blood vitamin D levels, the researchers found.

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First Ketamine Guidelines for Pain Released A driving force behind this is the growing effort to find a long-term replacement for opioids, an addictive painkiller that has plunged the country into an epidemic of death and addiction.

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Obesity Drives Liver Cancer in Developed Nations Liver cancer incidence is highest in the United Kingdom (9.6 per 100,000 people), followed by 9.2 in the United States, 7.4 in Australia and 6.0 in Canada. The rankings are the same for liver cancer deaths.

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Salmonella Risk Spurs Kellogg Honey Smacks Recall According to the CDC, 73 illnesses potentially tied to contaminated cereal have been reported across 31 states. Twenty-four people have been hospitalized, but no deaths have been reported. Illnesses have been reported from May 3 through May 28.

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Human Brain Hard-Wired to Love Fat-Carb Combo These findings jibe with suggestions that snacks like nacho-flavored chips are foods perfectly engineered to push your buttons, containing "the right combo of fat, carb and salt," said Dr. Mitchell Roslin, chief of obesity surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

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Sex, Drugs Hold Less Allure for High Schoolers Between 2007 and 2017, the percentage of high school students who said they had ever had sex fell from 48 percent to 39.5 percent, and the percentage who said they'd had four or more sexual partners decreased from 15 percent to just under 10 percent.

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E-Cig Flavorings May Damage Blood Vessel Lining These results provide further evidence that e-cigarettes are not necessarily a benign way to help quit smoking, said Dr. Benjamin Hirsh,  director of preventive cardiology at Northwell Health's Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y.

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Binge Drinking: A Hazard for Teen Bones? The study of college women included some who reported regularly binge drinking during high school and in the first year of college. That means downing four or more alcoholic drinks in a two-hour period.

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Unvaccinated Kids Create Risk of U.S. 'Hot Spots' The researchers found that among children enrolling in kindergarten, the number of those with nonmedical exemptions has increased since 2009 in 12 states, resulting in lower rates of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella.

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Child in Idaho Has Plague The department said the child recently returned from a trip to Oregon, but it's not known whether the youngster contracted the plague in that state or in Idaho, the Journal reported.

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Who Will and Who Won't Get the Flu? Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine say they've identified a "biomarker" that indicates a person's susceptibility to flu viruses.

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'Acute' Insomnia Hits 1 in 4 in U.S., most... Tracking more than 1,400 adults nationwide for a year, researchers found that  about 75 percent of those who dealt with acute insomnia recovered good sleep within 12 months.

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For Many, Prescription Meds Linked to Depression About 15 percent of adults are thought to use five or more prescription medications simultaneously, the researchers said in background notes.

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High BP in Your 50s May Set Stage for Dementia The researchers found that people at age 50 had an increased risk of dementia later in life if their systolic pressure was higher than 130.

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Plastic Surgery for Men Surges Over the past five years, there was a 23 percent increase in liposuction and a 12 percent increase in tummy tucks among men, and a 30 percent increase in male breast reductions, according to the society.

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Honey Helps When Kids Swallow Button Batteries When a swallowed button battery reacts with saliva and tissue of the esophagus, it creates a solution that dissolves tissue and can cause severe damage to the esophagus, airway, vocal cords and major blood vessels, the researchers explained.

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The ‘Dry Drowning’ Debate: What You Need to... Days after playing in the water, some children are struck by what is sometimes called "dry drowning." It's rare, but scary when it happens.

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5-Year-Old Girl Paralyzed by Tick Her mom saw she was acting strange. She had poor balance and slurred speech. Then she spotted it: A tick. The creature's bite was quickly paralyzing her daughter.

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U.S. Obesity Rates Rising Again Among U.S. men, for example, the rising rates of overweight and obesity seen since 1999 leveled off between 2009 and 2012. But they took off again in 2015-2016, when 75 percent of men were overweight or obese.

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Kitchen Towels Laden With Bacteria Specifically, the researchers found that towels used for a variety of tasks -- such as wiping utensils, drying hands, holding hot utensils  or cleaning surfaces -- had more bacteria than towels used for one task. In addition, damp towels had more bacteria than dry ones, the investigators found.

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Strict Gun Laws Lower Gun-Murder Rates in Cities Prior research has linked such laws to fewer deaths statewide, but the new research looked at urban areas, where nearly two-thirds of all U.S. gun deaths occur.

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Impotent? Maybe You Should See a Heart Doctor Experts have long observed that impotence is associated with poor cardiovascular health, but it was thought that obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes were some of the reasons why. This study found that impotence on its own is a significant risk factor.

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Articles last updated at Jun 22, 2018 09:27:15am.
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