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‘Consumer Reports’ Finds Heavy Metals in... Heavy metals at levels called ''troublesome'' are lurking in foods commonly eaten by babies and toddlers, according to a new Consumer Reports investigation of 50 packaged foods made for children.

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Aretha Franklin Dies of Pancreatic Cancer Aretha Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," died of pancreatic cancer. She had several recent health scares but did not reveal their causes.

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U.S. Opioid Abuse Fueling Life Expectancy Decline Life expectancy in the United States is declining, according to two new studies, largely because of drug abuse including opioid deaths. Suicide and alcoholism among people 25-64 were also key factors.

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New Drug of Last Resort Tackles Resistant HIV HIV, AIDS, treatment, T cells, monoclonal antibody

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Research Links Banned Insecticide DDT to Autism Women who had high exposure to the long-banned pesticide DDT appear to have a higher chance of having a child with autism, according to new research.

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Breast Cancer Drug Promising in Phase 3 Trial An experimental drug could improve survival for women with breast cancer who have the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations, a new study says.

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Roundup Chemical in Your Cereal: What to Know Out of 61 food samples tested, 48 had some glyphosate in them. The most heavily contaminated were made with conventionally grown — as opposed to organically grown — oats.

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Here’s Another Reason Kidney Transplants Fail Researchers have found strong evidence that if a kidney transplant doesn’t work, it may be due to the “wear and tear” on the organ before it’s donated.

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Study: Fluoride Crucial To Prevent Cavities Even if you brush your teeth regularly, fluoride is what helps you avoid cavities, a new study reports.

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Abnormal Heat Forecast Worldwide Through 2022 While global warming appeared to have eased early in the 21st century, a new forecasting method points to the likelihood of abnormally high average air temperatures worldwide.

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Women Exposed Early to Smoke May Face More RA... Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke might raise women’s risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, new research finds.

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Amputation Not Best Option for Circulation Woes? Critical limb ischemia is the most severe form of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and can lead to ulcers, gangrene and amputation, the researchers said.

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What Predicts a Woman's Odds of Living To 90? A long-term study of about 22,000 postmenopausal women in the United States found that those whose mothers had lived to age 90 were 25 percent more likely to reach that milestone without suffering serious health issues. The chances are even higher if both parents reached 90.

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Study Hints at Why Women Suffer More Migraines Results of new research suggest that changing levels of the female sex hormone estrogen make cells around a key nerve in the head and connected blood vessels more sensitive to migraine triggers, scientists say. And that increases migraine risk.

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Mayo, Cleveland Clinics Again Top Hospital... The next two spots are also repeats from last year. Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore holds the No. 3 spot, and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston holds the No. 4 spot.

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New Triple-Combo Pill Aids Blood Pressure: Study Target blood pressure for people in the United States is now 130/80, according to the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

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Suicide Risk Higher in People with Brain Injury A person’s risk of suicide more than triples in the first six months after a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and it stays significantly higher over the long term, a new Danish study suggests.

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Vaping May Shut Off Lungs' Protective Cells The vapor from e-cigarettes was much more harmful than e-cigarette fluid to lung cells -- and the more the cells were exposed to it, the more they were damaged, scientists report in a new study.

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More Alzheimer's Gene Links Found The newly identified genes suggest that an inflammatory response and changes in the production of certain proteins contribute to brain deterioration in Alzheimer's patients.

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Women To Be Screened Yearly for Incontinence New guidelines from the Women's Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI) call for annual screening to determine whether a woman has urinary incontinence and whether it affects her daily activities and quality of life.

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Essential Oils Promise Help, But Beware the Risks In the past year alone, U.S. retail sales of essential oils soared 14% to $133 million -- up from $55 million in 2015 -- according to market research firm SPINS.

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Can Eating Crickets Boost Your Health? Eating crickets may help improve the natural bacteria in your gut (microbiome) and reduce inflammation in your body, according to a small new study at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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Lung Cancer Screening' Risks Not Discussed Enough Lung cancer screening is recommended for high-risk current and former smokers. But the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations say that doctors need to explain the risks as well as the benefits. Those risks include a high rate of false positives, which can lead to unnecessary follow-up procedures.

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More Drug Makers Tagged as Valsartan Recall Grows More than 20 European countries, Canada, and the United States have recalled valsartan medications in recent weeks after NDMA was discovered in the drugs’ ingredients manufactured by Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceuticals of Linhai, China.

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Study: Tdap Vaccine Doesn't Boost Autism Risk Children born to women who had a Tdap vaccination during pregnancy had no higher risk of autism than kids whose mothers were not vaccinated, a new study finds.

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Weak Grip May Signal Health Trouble Even in Kids In a new study followed children from 4th grade through 5th grade, children with weak grips were over three times more likely to remain in poor health or to have declines in health than those with strong grips.

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Study Links 3 Eye Diseases, Alzheimer's Patients with age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma had a 40 to 50 percent greater risk of Alzheimer's disease than those without the eye conditions, the authors of a new study report.

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'Snapchat Dysmorphia': Seeking Selfie Perfection In increasing numbers, people go to cosmetic surgeons requesting “fuller lips, bigger eyes, or a thinner nose” that they see in photo filters, according to new research. The trend, called “Snapchat dysmorphia,” was first identified in 2015 and is now raising alarm among some physicians.

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Court Rules EPA Must Ban Sales of Pesticide Even tiny levels of exposure to chlorpyrifos can damage babies' brains, research shows.

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This Spirited Toddler Has Rare Brittle Bone Dis Three-year-old Byron Baxter has bones that break easily, sometimes with just a wave of his hand, his parents say. But he’s inspiring social media fans with his fighting spirit and cheerfulness in videos and pics his family posts online.

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Women With Asthma More Likely to Develop COPD More than 4 in 10 women with asthma developed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and heavy smoking and obesity were among the significant risk factors, a new study found.

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Early Onset Type 1 Diabetes Tied to Heart Disease Compared with the control group, life expectancy averaged 16 years less for people diagnosed with diabetes before age 10. Those diagnosed at an older age died, on average, 10 years earlier than people without diabetes.

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New Dads Can Get the Baby Blues, Too New research confirms that roughly 10 percent of new dads experience postpartum depression, and up to 18 percent have some type of anxiety disorder after the birth of a child.

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Prenatal Vitamin D Pills Won't Boost Baby's... Using vitamin D supplements while a woman was pregnant or after her child was born didn't help the baby grow, a new Canadian study found.

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Brain Evolution May Play Role in Mental Illnesses Illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be the result of changes in the human brain that took place during evolution, new research suggests.

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U.S. Trauma Doctors Push for Stricter Gun... Strict regulation of semi-automatic guns, accessories and ammunition, plus research, innovation, technology and cooperation are needed to tackle gun violence in much the same way they have been used to reduce car crash deaths by 27 percent over the past 20 years, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma says in a policy statement.

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Exercise Can Chase Away the Blues, to a Point A new analysis of data from 1.2 million people in the United States found they reported 3.4 days a month of poor mental health on average. But those who were physically active had 1.5 fewer "down" days a month than those who were not active.

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Frequent Skin Cancers May Signal Risk of Others For the study, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 61 patients with frequent basal cell carcinomas, and found 20 percent had mutations in genes that help repair DNA damage in body cells. Cancer arises when such abnormal cells grow and spread unchecked.

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Choosing to Induce Labor May Cut C-Section Risk Women who chose to have their labor induced were less likely to need a C-section than women who let nature take its course, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine. And there was no evidence labor induction carried any added risks for their babies.

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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Genes ID'd The team also found that mutations in the BRIP1 and RAD51C genes were associated with a more moderate risk of triple-negative breast cancer.

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Kids' Suicide Risk Tied Parents' Religious... The study, however, does not prove that a religious upbringing prevents suicide, only that there is an association between the two.

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More Primary Care Practices Aim to Treat the Mind The reality is that many people will go without mental health care if it doesn’t come from their primary care doctor, so integrating mental and behavioral health care into doctor practices makes sense, according to the American Psychological Association.

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Catch-Up HPV Shots Work for Teen Girls In the United States, HPV vaccination is recommended for girls aged 11-12. For those who did not receive the vaccine at this age, catch-up vaccination has been recommended between ages 13 and 26.

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Which Drugs Work Best for ADHD? Large Study... The researchers compared seven ADHD drugs -- amphetamines (including lisdexamfetamine), atomoxetine, bupropion, clonidine, guanfacine, methylphenidate and modafinil -- and a placebo over 12 weeks of treatment.

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To Fight Childhood Obesity, Start At Birth Moms who learned healthy nutrition strategies during their child’s first year had kids who were less likely to be overweight or obese, compared with children of mothers who were trained when the kids were between 3 and 5 years old, two new studies indicate.

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Can Eating Breakfast Help You Shed Pounds? Can breakfast help you slim down? WebMD has the answers.

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No Time for Breakfast? Try These Fast, Portable... Don’t skip breakfast! WebMD suggests five portable morning treats to get you out the door and start your day off right.

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Study: Hepatitis-Infected Kidneys OK to... Kidney transplants from organs infected with hepatitis C work as well as those with healthy organs, a finding that could help more people with kidney disease get off dialysis, researchers say.

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Women On Herceptin Need Regular Heart Checks Women who take the chemotherapy drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) for HER2-positive breast cancer can be at higher risk for heart failure and should have their hearts monitored during treatment, new research finds. The complication is not common, and in many cases, the benefits of the chemotherapy still outweigh the risks. But regular checks should be a priority.

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Women With Heart Attack Do Better If Doc is... Women are less likely to die from a heart attack if their treating doctor is a woman, new research shows.

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Articles last updated at Aug 17, 2018 05:16:06am.
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